Church Hurt: Is it time to leave? 

If you’ve been on TikTok or Instagram lately, you’ve likely seen countless videos, meme accounts, and stories about church hurt. For the last episode of season one, Whit and Adam explore church hurt and what to do about it. 

If you’ve been on TikTok or Instagram lately, you’ve likely seen countless videos, meme accounts, and stories about church hurt. For the last episode of season one, Whit and Adam explore church hurt and what to do about it. 

Often we think, that church is where everybody is supposed to be doing the right thing. The idea is there shouldn’t be any hurt at church. But unfortunately, that’s not true. The reason pain is in the church is because people are in the church. 

Church hurt is the result of sin.

There’s a duality to all of us. There are some negative things about us, and there are some positive things about us. There’s good in us, and there is some darkness in us too. We’re made in the image and likeness of God—that’s the good stuff. The sin part is the bad stuff. So we hurt each other as a result of our nature. 

The hope is that when you’re a part of a church, you’re allowing Jesus to work in your life. You’re allowing Jesus to remove those negative tendencies. But it doesn’t always happen that way.  

Are you allowing people to apologize? 

We all have desires and expectations, and sometimes those expectations just aren’t met. But people around us may have no idea how hurt we are by those unmet expectations. Biblically, there is a command that says, if your brother has done something against you, you should go to him. Often, we think it’s easier to carry our bitterness, disappointment, and unmet expectations, rather than going to the person who hurt us and having a conversation. It’s hard, and it’s scary to have those conversations, but it is worth it. 

Often, we end up making excuses for our feelings. We’ll say things like, “Well, it’s not that big of a deal” or “I don’t want to make it bigger than what it is.” But the hurt or disappointment ends up building more and more resentment. Disappointment, hurt, and unmet expectations are like wet concrete. If you don’t deal with it when it’s wet, it will eventually solidify and harden. Then, removing it becomes a lot more complicated. We hear so many stories of church hurt because we aren’t great as a culture about sitting down and being honest about our pain. Instead, we would rather avoid the uncomfortable feeling of being honest and leave the church.

The church is a covenantal relationship.

We often treat our churches like a product to be consumed. If the product makes us happy, we stick with it, but if we no longer like the product, we move on to the next best thing. Our relationship with our church comes down to how well the church can serve us or align with what we believe; it doesn’t take much to move from a fan to critic of the church. Like marriage, though, the church is meant to be deeper than a consumer-style relationship based on wants, needs, and expectations being met. Your relationship with the church should be covenantal—based on deep, lasting commitment. A covenantal relationship says, “For better or for worse, I’m here with you.”

So, what do I do about church hurt?

How do you navigate church hurt? How do you begin to have honest conversations? 

    1. Choose relationship over isolation.
      When there’s a conflict between you and someone else, resist the urge to avoid them. Instead, choose to see the best in them.
    2. Use “I notice ____ I would prefer ____” language.
      If you’re struggling to set a boundary, say what you noticed or didn’t like and address what you would prefer the person do in the future. For example, “I noticed you used my story as an example. I would prefer that you ask me before using it in the future.”
    3. Use “I’m puzzled, and I’m not assigning motive or blame” language.
      Sometimes you’re just hurt, and you need to be able to express that to the person. You can seek to understand and find healing by defining your hurt and not assigning motive or blame by simply saying, “I’m puzzled by this.”
    4. Tell the truth even when it’s uncomfortable.
      It’s worth repeating, don’t belittle or avoid your hurt. Express how you’re feeling and allow people to apologize.

If you need some help walking through how you’re feeling and the issue you’re experiencing, try using Pete Scazzero’s ladder of integrity.

There is no excuse for physical, emotional, or verbal abuse. If you are being abused, notify someone in authority and separate yourself from the situation right away.

Read more for Spirit In Motion: “The church is not a building”

True Lies: “Your past does not define you.”

You’ve probably heard someone say, “Your past does not define you,” which is kind of true. It doesn’t define, but it does affect you. In this season of Spirit In Motion, we’re looking at “true lies.” True lies are things that we say that have a hint of truth but ultimately have been misunderstood.

You’ve probably heard someone say, “Your past does not define you,” which is kind of true. It doesn’t define, but it does affect you. In this season of Spirit In Motion, we’re looking at “true lies.” True lies are things that we say that have a hint of truth but ultimately have been misunderstood.

In this episode of Spirit In Motion, Church on the Move Lead Pastor Whit George and Kids Pastor Adam Bush discuss the lies around dealing with your past and the statement, “Your past does not define you.” 

The true lie with “your past does not define you” is that your past doesn’t affect you. That there’s no need to look at the past pain or mistakes because they no longer define you. We agree that your past does not define you, but it is affecting you. 

“There’s a difference between looking at who you’ve been and identifying with who you’ve been.”

Everything we go through marks and shapes us, sometimes in good ways and other times in bad ways. You should be able to honestly address who and where you’ve been without identifying as someone who is still dealing with those things. There’s a difference between looking at who you’ve been and identifying with who you’ve been. You should be able to freely say, “I was an alcoholic because of ______” but no longer feel the weight of shame from identifying as an alcoholic.

Why is it so important to look back? 

It’s not about going back to live there; it’s about going back to get free. Jesus doesn’t want you to live there or stay there. He wants to heal you and deal with the issues that began there. He wants to look at the source of the problem with you. Many of us live with the same problems, the same pain points that keep coming up, and we’re unaware of them. So what can we do? 

“You can’t be healed from what you’re unwilling to acknowledge.”

Allowing Jesus into the most painful parts of the past is the only way to be free. You can’t be healed from what you’re unwilling to acknowledge. But for some of us, it’s tough to explore our pasts on our own. One of the best ways to work through your past is in conversation with others. A counselor, a friend, or the people in a small group can help point out the patterns from your past that are still affecting you. Whit and Adam specifically mention the following as ways to find freedom from your past:

Real Jesus 
Small Groups
Counseling

Facing past pains

Who knows your story, your struggle, and your secrets? Not everyone has to know your story, struggle, and secrets, but someone has to know. We live under a mistaken illusion that “it’s my burden to carry,” and worship at the altar of “Lone Ranger Christianity” rather than recognizing the words of Jesus that says, “take up your cross and follow me.” We’re so unwilling to face the pain, be honest with people, and go to counseling that we end up not following Jesus fully. We miss out on the resurrection and freedom found in Jesus because we’re afraid to experience pain. 

If you’re in the Tulsa area, here is a list of Christian counselors we recommend. If you’re not in the Tulsa area, we encourage you to search out a Christian counselor that can help you walk toward freedom. 

Identity and the Lie of “Follow your dreams”

We’re not trying to be anti-inspirational this week, but… “you should follow your dreams” is a lie… What do we mean by that? Well, the problem with statements like “Follow your dreams”, “BE YOUR OWN HERO”, “You be you”, is that they’re crushing us. They put unhealthy pressure on us to figure out who we are, be a unique person, choose the right career path, and make choices that will lead to LIVING OUR BEST LIFE. 

We’re not trying to be anti-inspirational this week, but… “you should follow your dreams” is a lie… What do we mean by that? Well, the problem with statements like “Follow your dreams”, “BE YOUR OWN HERO”, “You be you”, is that they’re crushing us. They put unhealthy pressure on us to figure out who we are, be a unique person, choose the right career path, and make choices that will lead to LIVING OUR BEST LIFE. 

In this episode of Spirit In Motion, Church on the Move Lead Pastor Whit George and Kids Pastor Adam Bush explore the topic of IDENTITY and the statement, “You should follow your dreams.” We like to call a statement like that a true lie. There’s a hint of truth to it, but ultimately the idea has resulted in a misunderstood, broken concept… a true lie.

WHAT IS IN YOUR INSTAGRAM FEED BUT MORE OPTIONS OF WHO YOU COULD BE?

A lot of times, when someone says, “Follow your dreams”, we don’t even know where to begin because we don’t even really know who we are. And when we try to figure it all out, it gets really complicated. What we’re talking about in this episode is identity—what makes you, you. We are bombarded every day with the pressure to live our best lives and be “something special”. What is your Instagram feed but more options of who you could be, where you could go, and what you could do? It seems like identity and fulfillment is the pot of gold at the end of a rainbow called “following my dreams”. But often, we hear stories of people who got to the end of the rainbow only to find that the gold they were looking for wasn’t there.

Look for steps, not master plans.

So how do you know who you are, and how do you build your identity? The short answer: time.  You build your identity over time. You discover who you are over and over again by taking one doable step at a time. The follow your dreams narrative wrecks people because it says that these “steps” need to be leading toward a master plan of success and fulfillment. It lies to you and tells you that you need to know every part of the master plan before you take a step. So there is a crushing burden of trying to figure out, “What college do I go to?” “What do I major in?” “What job should I take?” and the narrative of our lives becomes “I DON’T WANT TO SCREW THIS UP.” 

The invitation of Jesus is, “Come follow me.” 

What if instead of “follow your dreams”, you changed the narrative to “follow Jesus”? Following Jesus is a FAITH journey. He has the master plan, and you don’t really know where He’s taking you. Following Jesus means being led in steps, not master plans. So as He puts a small doable step in front of you, you take it.

By faith, Abraham, when called to go to a place, he would later receive as his inheritance, obeyed and went, even though he did not know where he was going. — Hebrews 11:8 

We see throughout scripture stories of people taking a step even though they have no idea where they are heading. Those stories illuminate a truth about God’s relationship with humanity… He does not give people master plans; He gives them steps. What would it look like to release the crushing pressure of following your dreams and begin to simply follow Jesus? 

Looking for more on this topic? Listen and read,  Lost dreams: How to recognize, embrace, and grieve them well.

Listen to Whit and Adam explore this subject in-depth on this week’s episode of Spirit In Motion on Apple Podcast, Spotify, or YouTube.

“Porn is a victimless crime”

Is porn a victimless crime? Culture has been exploring what is acceptable sexually since… well, forever. The truth is, everyone draws the line sexually somewhere. So, where do you draw the line? Is pornography acceptable?


Is porn a victimless crime? Culture has been exploring what is acceptable sexually since… well, forever. The truth is, everyone draws the line sexually somewhere. So, where do you draw the line? Is pornography acceptable?

In this episode of Spirit In Motion, Church on the Move Lead Pastor Whit George and Kids Pastor Adam Bush explore the statement, “Porn is a victimless crime.” We like to call a statement like that a true lie. There’s a hint of truth to it, but ultimately the idea has resulted in a misunderstood, broken concept… a true lie.

“Sex is for pleasure.”

Whit is extremely vulnerable in this week’s episode. He shares details about his past struggle with pornography to help the listener visualize the long-term effects of using pornography. He says, “if you only think about sex from the standpoint of pleasure, then it becomes a self-centered activity. It’s all about you. That’s really what happens with porn and masturbation. It’s a way to physically physiologically train yourself that your needs, your pleasure comes first.” It’s no wonder that porn and pride go together. It’s no wonder that porn and greed, porn and lust, all of these things happen together because it’s all about feeding a selfish desire.

Pornography is the enemy of intimacy.

The end game of sex is intimacy. The problem with pornography is that it destroys your capacity for intimacy. Think about it, is there any less intimate sex than porn and masturbation? There’s literally no one else there. So there’s no real investment that has to be made. You don’t need to know the name of any of the people involved, and they don’t even need to know that you exist.

So, who is the victim of porn?

The short answer is: You. There are a lot of pornography users, Christian or not, who would say pornography hasn’t benefited their lives. The individual pornography user suffers from pride, selfishness, and addiction. But beyond that, anyone who loves the user also suffers because porn destroys the user’s capacity for intimacy and real connection.

“But is pornography use really hurting me?” Porn is forming in you a more selfish desire. Pornography doesn’t just affect one private, secret part of your life. It is shaping every part of our life around your own selfish desires. In this episode, Whit says, “to think that I can contain pornography use in a little compartment of my life and it not bleed out into the other parts of who I am, is a mistake. I think you’re fooling yourself if you think that’s possible.”

Struggling with Pornography?

If you’re struggling with pornography, take a step. Text “OVER IT” to 23101 for a pastor from Whit and Adam’s church to connect with you. They’ll help you get connected to a community of people facing this challenge together.

In this episode, Whit and Adam talk about Whit sharing his story at their church, Church on the Move. You can hear his story here, Intimacy over Pornography from Church on the Move.

more episodes on porn

• Life In Motion: Porn is the Problem pt. 1
• Life In Motion: Porn is the Problem pt. 2
• Blog: Intimacy Over Porn by Blaine Bartel

True lies: “The church is not a building.”

With the rise of online gatherings, there’s no doubt you’ve heard someone say, “The church is not a building.” But if the church isn’t a building, then what is it? We live in a time with access to more churches, sermons, resources than ever before, so the question is, “Why church?” Why would someone physically go to a church building in 2021?

With the rise of online gatherings, there’s no doubt you’ve heard someone say, “The church is not a building.” But if the church isn’t a building, then what is it? We live in a time with access to more churches, sermons, resources than ever before, so the question is, “Why church?” Why would someone physically go to a church building in 2021? 

In this episode of Spirit In Motion, Church on the Move Lead Pastor Whit George and Kids Pastor Adam Bush, explore the statement “the church is not a building.” We like to call a statement like that a true lie. There’s a hint of truth to it, but ultimately the idea has resulted in a misunderstood, broken concept… a true lie. 

“YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH THE CHURCH SHOULD BE COVENANTAL.” 

What’s the depth of your relationship with your home church? Often, we treat our churches like we treat Apple. We’re big fans of Apple because their products work, but if we no longer like their product, we’d move on to the next best thing. There’s a commitment to the brand, but there isn’t a covenant. Our relationship with our church really comes down to how well the church can serve us or align with what we believe; it doesn’t take much to move from a fan to critic of the church. 

Like marriage, the church is meant to be deeper than a consumer-style relationship that’s based on wants, needs, and expectations being met. Your relationship with the church should be covenantal—based on deep, lasting commitment. A covenantal relationship says, “for better or for worse, I’m here with you.”

Accessibility to church content.

The mass amounts of content options and church options have caused us to view the church as a buffet line—our level of commitment is up to us. We think, whoever is meeting my needs at the time, whichever church organization, spiritual advisor, YouTube prophet, whatever is meeting my needs, I listen to them and get what I feel like I need. The problem is you never really end up being shepherded, pastored, or led. 

It’s more dangerous than you think.

We tend to listen to what we want to hear, but a healthy relationship means hearing things that you don’t want to hear from time to time. 

In Scripture, we see Paul talking about having “itching ears”. He says a time will come when people will run to teachers who soothe our ears. Simply put, we’ll only listen to people who say the things that we want to hear. That can be really dangerous because part of being in a healthy relationship is hearing things that you don’t want to hear. 

What’s the value of being physically connected to a church?

Gathering with other believers is an essential part of following Jesus. Let’s be clear: the building is not special; the gathering is special. Throughout scripture, we see God constantly looking for His people, His congregants, the people gathered in His name. 

God connects to us, not just as individuals but in a community. If you think about it from the very beginning, God tells Adam and Eve, “Be fruitful and multiply.” God tells Abraham, “I’m going to make you into a nation.” In other words, God is continually forming a group of people. The Old Testament story is God in search of a people—God looking for a nation. Israel becomes that people. The New Testament tells the story of a new people being brought into the body of Christ, becoming one body, one gathering, one group of people. 

To say that you can connect to God without the church is to cut yourself off from the assembly or the people of God, which is something that God has desired from the very beginning. When you cut yourself off from the people of God, you work against God’s plan, God’s desire, and God’s design. 

As a community, we grow so much more when we’re in deep relationships with one another. Being a Christ-follower is not just about taking in spiritual information; it’s about being connected to His body of believers, sharing stories, prayers, hope, and being challenged directly.

We are not just brains; we are spirit, soul, and body. 

Think about this: your body has knowledge your brain does not have. Most of us can’t list the keys’ arrangement on the keyboard, but our fingers know where they are. You probably couldn’t tell someone all the streets in the neighborhood you grew up on, but you would know your way around again if you went back there. Your body has knowledge that your brain doesn’t have. 

We are acquiring knowledge just by what we do. 

All the different things you participate in are shaping you more than you know. The act of getting out of bed, getting dressed, driving across town, walking into a room, sitting in silence for a moment, singing songs, standing up and sitting down, and all the different things that we participate in when we go to a physical church service are shaping us more than we know. 

When we disconnect ourselves from community and physically being in church, we lose something more significant than we realize. We lose connection to the body. 

The church is not a spectator sport. It’s not a big show to be entertained by the latest song, dance, and great sermon. It’s an invitation, not just to attend but to be a part of a community. Church is an invitation to a more profound commitment to Christ by spurring one another toward good works.

Listen to Whit and Adam explore this subject in-depth on this week’s episode of Spirit In Motion on Apple Podcast, Spotify, or YouTube.

Listen to Episode One of Spirit in Motion, True Lies: “Christians should be ready to defend their beliefs.”

True Lies: “Christians should be ready to defend their beliefs”

Today, we’re looking at the idea that, “Christians should be ready to defend their beliefs.” We like to call a statement like that a true lie. There’s a hint of truth to it, but ultimately the idea has resulted in a misunderstood, broken concept… a true lie. 

Defending our beliefs is an interesting topic right now. With the pandemic, the election, increased racial tensions, and government control questions, there seems to be so much more tension and division. In response to all of this, people feel like their backs are up against the wall, and if they don’t defend their beliefs, then they’ll be overtaken by the other side.

It’s unfortunate, but it’s tough to have honest and open conversations with people these days. In this episode, Whit George and Adam Bush explore how to have conversations with people… even the people you may disagree with.

With social media, there’s more opportunity for echo chambers than ever before. You can surround yourself with people who affirm and agree with what you believe. The natural human tendency is to hang out with people who don’t disagree with you. It’s hard to be around people who are just wildly different than you. We tend to gravitate toward environments, message boards, communities, and friend groups that agree with us. So, when we put our opinion out there, it gets echoed back to us. The echo chambers powerfully reinforce what we believe. So when we encounter people who don’t believe the same as us, it can be shocking.

“WE MAKE A DEVIL OUT OF SOME PEOPLE AND JESUS OUT OF OTHERS.”

It can be difficult not to make a devil out of some people and Jesus out of other people based on how they voice their opinion. When you do that, you run the risk of alienating the very people you’re trying to talk to and building more consensus with the people who already agree with you. 

So, what do we do?

There’s a story in scripture where Jesus is in the garden, the night before He’s crucified. There’s a mob that comes to arrest Him. As they’re taking Him away, there is a confrontation between Jesus’ disciples and this group of people that want to arrest Jesus. Scripture says that Peter, Jesus’ disciple, grabs a sword and ends up cutting off a man’s ear. 

“WE END UP CUTTING OFF THE EARS OF PEOPLE WE’RE TRYING TO COMMUNICATE TO.” 

When we, as followers of Christ, go to the sword, when we come out with weapons, and we’re ready to fight or defend, we end up cutting off the ears of the people we’re trying to communicate to. They can’t hear us because we came with the sword. 

Jesus says, “put your sword away, Peter. He who lives by the sword will die by the sword.” Jesus’ Kingdom doesn’t grow through fighting; it expands through peace and compassion. Jesus said by this, all men will know that you’re my disciples, that you love one another. It’s the love that we have for each other that opens people’s eyes and ears.

Listening is never a bad thing. 

When people feel heard, they’re willing to listen so much more. The greatest way we can love the people we disagree with is to listen to them. When you find yourself in a conversation where you want to defend your beliefs, when tensions are starting to get elevated, ask yourself, “what’s my motive for continuing this conversation?” Is it pride? Am I trying to dominate and win this conversation? Or am I trying to share with someone something that I think?

Listen to Whit and Adam explore this subject in-depth on this week’s episode of Spirit In Motion on Apple Podcast, Spotify, or YouTube.

Listen to Episode One of Spirit in Motion: Have you met the real Jesus?

If I follow Jesus, everything will be easy.

In this week’s episode, Whit George and Adam Bush discuss the questions, “What’s the point of pain?” “Why do bad things happen to good people?” We’re looking at the idea that “if you follow Jesus, everything will be easy.” We like to call a statement like that a true lie. There’s a hint of truth to it, but ultimately the idea has resulted in a misunderstood, broken concept … a true lie. 

 

In this week’s episode, Whit George and Adam Bush discuss the questions, “What’s the point of pain?” “Why do bad things happen to good people?” We’re looking at the idea that “if you follow Jesus, everything will be easy.” We like to call a statement like that a true lie. There’s a hint of truth to it, but ultimately the idea has resulted in a misunderstood, broken concept … a true lie

Adam shares his story of losing his dad at a young age, and they discuss that complicated question we all face at some point, “Why?

IF I FOLLOW JESUS, EVERYTHING WILL BE_____.

How do you fill in the blank? Do you think everything will be safe? Everything will be your idea of good. The journey of following Jesus means following Him into the unknown and into times where you will not be able to answer that question. In this episode, Whit and Adam talk about what to do when you don’t know that everything will be alright. When you doubt that God is really good because what’s happening to you is really bad.

IF I FOLLOW JESUS LIFE WILL BE BETTER.

If you’ve done any training or intense workout, you know that pain produces fruit. The same is true for following God. God may not orchestrate the pain we face, but He will use it to produce fruit in you. We can find comfort in knowing that with God, there is a point to pain. 

We do people a disservice when we say, “Follow Jesus, life will be easy.” What we really mean to say is, “follow Jesus. Life will be better.” Will it be hard? Yes. Will it be worth it? Yes. 

What is a True Lie?

Sometimes it feels like you’re not allowed to question the ideas you grew up believing. In this first season of Spirit In Motion, we want to look at concepts we’ve grown up saying and believing, ask questions, and discuss both sides of the conversations. Next week, we’ll be exploring the true lie: Christians should be ready to defend their beliefs.

Listen to Whit and Adam discuss the point of pain.

Learn more about Spirit In Motion here.

Have you met the real Jesus?

Have you met the real Jesus? One way to tell is by looking at how you treat people or think about yourself—it’s a direct expression of the way God is working in you. To put it plainly, our love for God is expressed in our love for other people.

 

Whit George, Lead Pastor of Church On The Move, and Adam Bush, Kids Pastor at Church On The Move, sat down for an honest and in-depth conversation about letting God change them. They call the experience, “meeting the real Jesus.”

Whit George on the set of, "Have you met the Real Jesus?" Episode One of Spirit In Motion.

Have you met the real Jesus? One way to tell is by looking at how you treat people or think about yourself—it’s a direct expression of the way God is working in you. To put it plainly, our love for God is expressed in our love for other people.

A lot of Christ-followers become more interested in gaining knowledge about interesting biblical facts or useful techniques for prayer than allowing God or those techniques to deeply change them.

Maybe you’re reading this and you’re puzzled by how often you’re able to disassociate those two things: loving God and loving people. You can’t figure out why you’re so short with the people in line at Starbucks. Or why you’re yelling at people to get out of your way. Or maybe you’ve become increasingly puzzled by people who disagree with you politically or socially.

So what needs to change?

The quick answer: your affections for Jesus and your willingness to let Him change you. If you were to ask Whit and Adam 1o years ago, do you love Jesus? The answer would have been, absolutely. They both worked at a church (and still do). Their affections for God were real, they just weren’t nearly to the depth that they are now, and because of that their relationships suffered.

We find God as useful.

It’s easy to think if you give God your good behavior, in return He’ll protect you. Or if we read the Bible or say a prayer every now and then, He’ll bless you. Sometimes we end up thinking of God as a sort of vending machine. We find Him to be useful, just not beautiful.

We need to find God beautiful.

God desires relationship with you, and there is life in that relationship. God is our creator, and connection to Him is connection to life itself.  In other words, the deepest, most meaningful thing about existence is that we’re connected to this Creator. So to get closer to Him, is like getting closer to the source of life and everything good. It’s like the sun on a plant, there’s growth. Finding God beautiful is really the journey of what it is to be human, to become fully yourself, and fully alive.

Little by little, as you begin to make Jesus the object and focus of your life the more you’ll begin to change. The strangest things will start happening! You’ll have more patience for people, more love for your family, and more grace for people who are struggling. You’ll begin to see in Jesus a more beautiful way to do things.

Listen to Whit and Adam discuss their personal experience with meeting the real Jesus.

Learn more about Spirit In Motion here.

About Spirit In Motion

Spirit In Motion is a podcast hosted by Whit George and Adam Bush where they talk about their spiritual journeys and attempt to make sense of it all. It’s not often that you get to hear pastors be as honest and open as Whit and Adam are on this podcast.

WHAT DO THEY TALK ABOUT?

Each season we choose a different spiritual theme and share stories and ideas related to that theme. Spirit In Motion focuses on actively deconstructing yourself, the things you’ve learned, and the ideas you have and aligning each of those areas with the life and teaching of Jesus found in scripture. They share stories on how they stopped avoiding the reality of what was going on in their lives and continually bring the dark parts of life to light.

FINDING GOD BEAUTIFUL

“I realized that I found God to be useful, just not beautiful. Little by little, the more I started to think about that—the more I understood that, the more I fell in love with Jesus for real. I wasn’t the same self-centered, prideful, egotistical person that I’d always been. I found myself having more patience with my wife and kids, being more understanding, and being more empathetic.”

“…THE MORE I UNDERSTAND THAT, THE MORE I FELL IN LOVE WITH JESUS FOR REAL.”

“All of the things that I lacked before naturally started to happen for me. Not that there’s no effort in any of it, but I found myself wanting to do new things because I saw in Jesus a more beautiful way than the way I was doing things before. And I thought, ‘well, then I want to be more like that because if that’s who you are, that’s how I want to be… because that’s so much better than what I’ve been doing.’”

—Whit George, Spirit In Motion: Forget the Rules. It’s Really About Relationship.